THE HUMAN PROTEIN ATLAS BLOG

A systems approach to the liver

2016-07-26
Genomics Liver Metabolomics Phenomics Proteomics Transcriptomics

Multiscale -omics technologies and integrated network approaches unveiled the link between genetic variance and phenotypic differences in liver.

In a recent number of Nature Reviews, Human Protein Atlas researchers Mathias UhlÚn and Adil Mardinoglu discuss a study by E.G. Williams and co workers in Science where five complementary -omics datasets across various environmental states (including genomics, transcriptomics, proteomics, metabolomics and phenomics) using the liver as a platform for multiomics analysis are integrated...Read more


Image of the week - Nucleoli fibrillar center

2016-07-22

Figure 1. Staining of NOLC1 (green) with DNA (blue) and microtubules (red) in U-2 OS cells.

This week, image of the week highlights another organelle, the nucleoli fibrillar center!! This week's contribution is brought to us by Lovisa ┼kesson, who works on the Subcellular protein atlas, and specializes in understanding nuclear function.

A few months ago, an excellent example of a protein located in the nucleoli rim was shown in another blog post. Today, we are diving deeper into the function of the nucleoli and specifically the fibrillar center, another nucleolar compartment.

As mentioned before, the nucleolus is a non-membrane bound structure located within the nucleus and there is usually more than one in each nucleus...Read more


Principal Investigator with a taste for plasma

2016-07-19
Biobank profiling Plasma Proteomics

Jochen Schwenk

Today we meet yet another researcher within the Human Protein Atlas project, Jochen Schwenk, Associate Professor for Translational Proteomics at KTH - Royal Institute of Technology in Stockholm, Sweden. He is Director of the Biobank Profiling facility at the Science for Life Laboratory and a Principal Investigator within the Human Protein Atlas and the KTH Center for Applied Proteomics.

– I have a PhD in Biochemistry from the University of TŘbingen in Germany, and when I saw presentations from the Human Protein Atlas Director Mathias UhlÚn at a few meetings I thought that this would be an exiting project to work with after my PhD thesis, Jochen Schwenk says...Read more


Image of the week - Nuclear mem & Tubulin by xTruf

2016-07-15

Figure 1. Staining of TOR1AIP1 (green) labeling the nuclear membrand and microtubules in A-431 cells.

It's time for another HPA image of the week! This week we interrupt our series of organelle highlights to bring you another great image brought to us by the citizen scientists in Project Discovery, and specifically by x Truf a member of the Signal Cartel in EVE online who found this image while playing Project Discovery. This is x Truf's second contribution to our image of the week, and we'd like to give special thanks for these contributions!

The protein stained in Fig 1. is an image of Torsin A interacting protein 1 (TOR1AIP1, also known as LAP1). This staining shows signal specific to both the nuclear membrane and microtubules...Read more


Profiling cancer testis antigens

2016-07-12
Cancer Testis

Dijana Djureinovic, the first author of the study

In a recent publication in JCI Insight researchers from the Human Protein Atlas have described the expression of the currently known cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) in non-small cell lung cancer, and have added 50 new CTAs to this list.

Lung cancer is the most common cause of cancer related death in Sweden and worldwide. Most patient present with advanced disease and have a short life expectancy despite modern therapy.

Dijana Djureinovic is a PhD student in the group of Cecilia Lindskog at Science for Life Laboratory. She started her PhD studies two years ago, but worked in the project before that, on antibody validation...Read more


Image of the week - The tiny but mighty centrosome

2016-07-08
Centrosome Image of the week Subcell Atlas

Figure 1. Staining of MKKS (green) with DNA (blue) and microtubules (red) in U-2 OS cells.

Let's have a look at another fascinating compartment of the cell, the centrosome! Located in close proximity to the nucleus, the centrosome is so small that it sometimes suffers from being overlooked. However, despite its humble size it is a very important organelle with great impact on cellular function.

The centrosome was first described in 1888 and has been a very popular organelle to study among biology researchers ever since (Conduit P.T. 2015). The most well characterized function of the centrosome is to serve as the organizing center for the microtubules that build up the internal architecture of the cell, the so-called cytoskeleton...Read more


The secretome and membrane proteome

2016-07-05
Membrane proteins Proteome Secretome

Secreted and membrane-bound proteins are important for physiological processes and are potential drug targets as they are easily accessible in the extracellular space and provide a gateway to the intracellular environment. About 3,000 protein-coding genes are predicted members of the secretome; examples of secreted proteins are cytokines, coagulation factors, hormones, and growth factors. Important members of the membrane proteome, consisting of about 5,500 genes encoding predicted membrane-bound proteins, are ion channels of molecular transporters, enzymes, receptors, and anchors for other proteins.

A majority of the human genes encode several splice variants...Read more


Image of the week - the cell cycle and mitosis

2016-07-01
Cell cycle Image of the week Mitosis Subcell Atlas

Figure 1. Selected cells from the Subcellular HPA showing the progression of the stages of mitosis (clockwise), with DNA (blue) and microtubules (red) in U-2 OS cells.

It's time for another Image of the week! This week's image is brought to us by Diana Mahdessian, who works on the Subcellular protein atlas, and highlights cell division and various stages of mitosis. In previous blogs we have discussed the importance of certain proteins in the cell cycle including dividing centrosomes and FDXR in mitochondria.

The cell cycle is an ordered series of events that ultimately leads to the division of the "mother" cell into two "daughter" cells (cells are given feminine names because they are capable of reproducing).

The cell cycle consists of three distinct phases; interphase, mitosis and cytokinesis...Read more