THE HUMAN PROTEIN ATLAS BLOG

Computational scientist with a focus on the liver

2016-08-30
Liver Systems biology

Adil Mardinoglu

Adil Mardinoglu is a SciLifeLab fellow and the newest addition to the Protein Atlas team of principal investigators. He is the leader of the systems biology group, a group that create biological networks to identify drug targets and discover biomarkers for the development of efficient treatment strategies.

But Adilīs background is not in medicine, he is an electronic engineer with a PhD in computational biology.

– I did my PhD in Ireland where I worked with magnetic drug targeting, he says.

After a one year post doc doing research on neuronal networks, Adil Mardinoglu moved to Chalmers in Gothenburg to join Jens Nielsens group in systems biology...Read more


Network-based approach to study lipid metabolism

2016-08-23
Lipid enzymes Liver cancer Metabolic networks Systems biology

Sunjae Lee

In a recent publication in Nucleic Acids Research, researchers from the Systems Biology group at the Human Protein Atlas investigated anomalies in regulation of lipid metabolism in the liver, in association with hepatocellular carcinoma.

Hepatocellular carcinoma has a high mortality rate and early detection of the disease is crucial for the application of effective treatment strategies. Several lines of evidence imply that lipid anomalies underlie the hepatocellular carcinoma pathogenesis.

Here, the researchers applied a tailored network-based approach to identify signaling hubs associated with regulation of this part of the metabolism...Read more


Stratification of patients using epitope mapping

2016-08-16
Complement system Deep mutational scanning Epitope mapping Precision medicine

To allow for precision medicine the genome of patients is sequenced to identify possible variations of the target gene.

In a paper published in Nature Scientific Reports last week, researchers from the Human Protein Atlas describe a method for stratification of responders towards the drug eculizumab that allows for precision medicine and should be applicable to several other diseases and therapeutics.

The term precision medicine describes the idea of providing effective treatment based on a patientīs molecular make up. Recent advances in molecular diagnostic tools and handling of large data sets allow for the stratification of patients based on e.g. genetic or protein information and make it possible to provide tailored treatment for these sub-groups...Read more


Image of the week - the Golgi apparatus

2016-08-12

Figure 1. Staining of GOLGA2 (green) with DNA (blue) in A-431 cells

This week, the image of the week highlights the Golgi apparatus. This week's contribution is brought to us by Peter Thul, a postdoctoral researcher who works on the Subcellular protein atlas, and specializes in understanding secretory pathway.

The Golgi apparatus was discovered by the Italian physician and scientist Camillo Golgi, who discovered the fine membraneous structure in 1898 (Mazzarello P., Garbarino C., & Calligaro A. 2009). Since then it has frequently drawn the attention of researcher because of its prominent role in the secretory pathway of cells.

The secretory pathway describes the route that proteins take to get to the outside of the cell...Read more


The cancer proteome

2016-08-09
Cancer Immunocytochemistry Proteome

Tumor protein p53 in colorectal cancer

Cancer can be defined as a common heterogeneous and potentially deadly disease that affects approximately 1/3 of the human population. The common denominator for cancer is the development of an uncontrolled growth of cells that eventually leads to multiple organ failure and death.

The cancer proteome is based on genes that are implicated in cancer. Expression of these genes in normal cells contributes to normal growth, survival and function, whereas dysregulated expression, including overexpression, loss of expression or expression of a defect protein in cancer cells contributes to ungoverned tumor growth...Read more


Image of the week - Cytoplasm

2016-08-05
Cytoplasm Image of the week Subcell Atlas

Figure 1. Staining of RELA (green) with DAPI (blue) and microtubules (red) in U2 OS cells.

Though frequently overlooked as being a "catch-all" for proteins that don't reside within another organelle, cytoplasmic proteins are anything but.

One important role of proteins in the cytoplasm is the regulation of gene expression. There are two main ways in which gene expression is regulated; when converting the genetic code in your DNA to RNA (transcription), and when converting RNA to proteins (translation). Though transcription (DNA to RNA) occurs in the nucleus, cytoplasmic proteins are often involved in activating transcription factors which then move to the nucleus to perform transcription.

The protein stained in Fig 1...Read more


Integrated networks for obese subjects

2016-08-02
Liver Metabolism Metabolomics

Graphical representation of the investigation

In a paper in a recent issue of Cell Metabolism, Human Protein Atlas-researchers investigate the biological processes that are altered in obese subjects.

Obesity is associated with an increased risk for a wide range of morbidities, including insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, non-alcoholic fatty liver disease, and cardiovascular disease. Although the prevalence of obesity continues to dramatically increase worldwide, a clear understanding of the underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the progression of associated disorders is still lacking...Read more