THE HUMAN PROTEIN ATLAS BLOG

Investigating brain-enriched proteins

2016-09-27   |   0 Comments
Brain Central nervous system Neurodegenerative disease

Overview of the study

In a recent study published in Proteomics Clinical Applications researchers from the Human Protein Atlas have profiled 280 brain-enriched proteins in cerebrospinal fluid from patients with Alzheimerīs disease, Parkinsonīs disease and dementia with Lewy bodies. This study is part of a larger effort aiming to expand the knowledge of brain-enriched proteins in human cerebrospinal fluid and to provide novel insight into the relation between such proteins and different neurodegenerative diseases.

The researchers report a multiplexed protein profiling using an affinity-based proteomics approach to generate cerebrospinal fluid profiles of brain-enriched proteins...Read more


Image of the week - CS and mitochondrial disease

2016-09-23   |   0 Comments

Figure 1. Staining of CS (green) with DAPI (blue) and microtubules (red) in U2 OS cells.

As it's Mitochondrial Disease Awareness Week, I know you have all been thinking about mitochondria all week. And you should! They are very important organelles.

Your mitochondria are responsible for much of the energy production in your cells. Perhaps the most interesting thing about mitochondria is that they have their own DNA which means some proteins in the mitochondria come from nuclear DNA and some from mitochondrial DNA. In a previous image of the week we highlighted TOMM5, a protein responsible for transport of nuclear encoded mitochondrial proteins into the mitochondria...Read more


Mad about Mitochondria

2016-09-20   |   0 Comments
Cell Atlas Mitochondria Subcell Atlas

Mikaela Wiking

This week, it is Mitochondrial Disease Awareness Week. Therefore we would like to take the opportunity to talk about the mitochondrial proteome, the work we do within this field, and you will even get to meet one of our researchers, involved in this work.

The mitochondria are distributed throughout the cytoplasm of the cell, each organelle enclosed by a double membrane, the inner one forming the characteristic folds known as cristae. Mitochondria are essential for producing the cell´s need of ATP through cellular respiration, but have also been shown to participate in many other cellular functions, including apoptosis, calcium storage and cellular signaling...Read more


Image of the week - Lysosomes

2016-09-16   |   0 Comments
Image of the week Lysosomes Subcell Atlas

Figure 1. Staining of TMEM192 (green) with DNA (blue) in U-2 OS cells.

Welcome to another HPA image of the week! This week we take a look at another member of the vesicle family, the lysosomes.

In a way, lysosomes can be thought of as the recycling plants of your cells. Lysosomes are small membrane bound vesicular organelles that degrade biomolecules within your cells so that the materials in these molecules can be recycled and used for other cellular processes. Often these biomolecules come from vesicles known as endosomes that bring in materials from outside your cells, however lysosomes are also known to degrade other organelles, and products from within the cell...Read more


Novel assay concept developed

2016-09-13   |   0 Comments
Antibody Microarray Autoantibody Multiple Sclerosis Proteomics

Burcu Ayoglu

In an article in a special edition of Proteomics, on protein arrays researchers from the Human Protein Atlas describe the development of a novel assay concept, which combines the flexibility and multiplexing capacity of single-binder assays and the specificity and sensitivity aspects of dual-binder assays. They developed a multiplexed dual-binder assay procedure, which is based on a sequential protein capture.

– This assay is a great addition to the antibody-array toolbox of the Biobank Profiling Group, both to support related assay development activities and for biomarker discovery applications, says Burcu Ayoglu, first author of the study...Read more


Image of the week - Lipid Droplets

2016-09-09   |   0 Comments

This week's image of the week shows an example for the growing number of organelles that we annotate in the Cell Atlas. Lipid droplet (LD) proteins fall under the vesicle category, but starting with version 16, they will have their own place in the Atlas? organelle panel.

LDs can be found in animals, plants, fungi and even some bacteria have them. They have a simple and evolutionary conserved structure: A hydrophobic core that contains the lipids is surrounded by a phospholipid monolayer with proteins attached. This phospholipid monolayer makes the LDs unique among organelles; all other membranes consist of a double layer...Read more


Proposed guidelines for antibody validation

2016-09-05   |   0 Comments
Antibody Validation Mass Spectrometry

Graphical representation of the five proposed strategies

An international working group has formulated directives to evaluate antibodies used in biomedical research. A paper in Nature Methods suggests five conceptual pillars for antibody validation.

Antibodies are used frequently both in research and in the clinic, and today over two million commercial antibodies are available for the analysis of human proteins. This has been accompanied with a dramatic development in clinical treatment of diseases, like cancer and autoimmune diseases, where biological drugs in the form of antibodies have changed the treatment of many patient categories...Read more


Image of the week - Endoplasmic reticulum

2016-09-02   |   0 Comments
Endoplasmic reticulum Image of the week Subcell Atlas

Staining of Calnexin (green) with DNA (blue) in A-431 cells

Welcome back blog fans! After a brief hiatus the image of the week highlights from the HPA are back! This week we are discussing the Endoplasmic reticulum, which is not just difficult to say, but is where many of your proteins are made.

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is one of the largest organelles in the cell. It is a delicate membranous network composed of sheets and tubules that spreads throughout the whole cytoplasm and is actually contiguous to the nuclear membrane. Two major forms of the ER can be distinguished: the rough ER and the smooth ER. Both have different functions...Read more