The human protein atlas blog


Image of the week - Long live the long-living lens proteins

2017-07-22
Eye Image of the week Immunohistochemistry Lens proteins

The beta-crystallin B2 protein, encoded by the CRYBB2 gene, is a very important structural component of the human eye lens. Immunohistochemical staining of CRYBB2 protein shows specific expression in the lens.

Previously we have highlighted proteins expressed in the human neural retina. Today, we will focus on the lens and shed light on its structure and function, and hopefully spark an interest in you for the proteins of the lens.

The main function of the lens is to focus light on the retina. The passage of light through the cornea, lens and vitreous all the way to the retinal layer of the eye is only possible due to transparency of the tissue. Although the lens is very protein-rich, light absorption and light scattering in the lens is minimal.

The lens comprise of non-diving lens cells which are mainly composed of ordered proteins called crystallins...Read more


Conference - keynote lecture at Europe-Korea Conference on Science and Technology

2017-07-15
Drug development Human Protein Atlas

Mathias Uhlen from the Human Protein Atlas will on July the 27 present a keynote lecture on the Europe-Korea Conference on Science and Technology (EKC2017) entitled "The Human Protein Atlas - implications for human biology, drug development and precision medicine"...Read more


Image of the week - TPX2

2017-07-08
Cell Atlas Cell cycle Image of the week Kinetochore

Mitotic spindle with TPX2 expression (green)

Let‘s have a look at the protein TPX2, a microtubule nucleation factor that translocates from the nucleus - where it resides during interphase - to the mitotic spindle during mitosis.

The mitotic spindle forms when chromosomes are ready to segregate during cell division and not surprisingly this protein is also found in this specific compartment of the cell! TPX2 is required for the correct formation of the kinetochores that is crucial for the attachment of microtubules, enabling the sister chromatids to be pulled apart...Read more