The human protein atlas blog


Focusing on Prognostic Genes in Lung Cancer

2017-10-13
Cancer Immunohistochemistry Lung cancer Pathology Atlas TCGA

Figure 1. Immunohistochemical staining of MPC1 using antibody HPA045119 shows a differential expression pattern in samples from lung cancer patients.

As part of the release of the Pathology Atlas, the Human Protein Atlas Blog will each week present a brief and informative summary where we highlight genes with prognostic association in different cancer forms. If you missed last week's blog post about prognostic genes in ovarian cancer, click here.

This week, we will focus on Lung cancer one of the deadliest cancers in the world today.

Lung cancer patients have a poor outcome with a 5-year survival rate of 13.6% in men and 19.4% in women. Late diagnosis and lack of effective treatments are considered to contribute to poor prognosis...Read more


Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month

2017-09-29
Cancer Immunohistochemistry Ovarian cancer awareness Ovarian cancer Pathology Atlas TCGA

Figure 1. Immunohistochemical staining of EPCAM using antibody CAB055098 shows differential expression in samples from ovarian cancer patients.

In this week's Pathology Atlas blog post, we highlight genes with prognostic association to ovarian cancer , as September is National Ovarian Cancer Awareness Month in the US. Ovarian cancer is the fifth most frequent cause of cancer death in women, and 50% of all ovarian cancers are diagnosed in women older than 65 years of age.

Epithelial ovarian carcinoma is one of the most common gynecologic malignancy. There are five subtypes of epithelial ovarian carcinoma, of which high-grade serous carcinoma is the most common...Read more


Focusing on prognostic genes in breast cancer

2017-09-07
Breast Cancer Cancer Immunohistochemistry Pathology Atlas TCGA

Figure 1. Immunohistochemical staining of CBX3 using antibody HPA004902 shows a differential nuclear expression in samples from breast cancer patients.

The Pathology Atlas, recently published in Science presents key proteins associated with different cancer types. This week, we will focus on breast cancer and proteins related to cancer prognosis.

Breast cancer is the most common invasive cancer form in women worldwide. The cancer can roughly be classified as ductal or lobular breast cancer depending on the origin. The majority of breast cancers develop sporadically, but for 5-10% of patients there is an inherited factor associated with increased breast cancer risk, namely the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Women with abnormal BRCA1 or BRCA2 have higher risk of developing breast cancer...Read more


New Pathology Atlas maps the genes involved in cancer and promotes personalized cancer medicine

2017-08-17
Cancer Human Protein Atlas Pathology Atlas

Pathology Atlas principle

A new Pathology Atlas is launched today with an analysis of all human genes in all major cancers showing the consequence of their corresponding protein levels for overall patient survival. The difference in expression patterns of individual cancers observed in the study strongly reinforces the need for personalized cancer treatment based on precision medicine. In addition, the systems level approach used to construct the Pathology Atlas demonstrates the power of "big data" to change how medical research is performed.

The dream of personalized treatment for cancer patients takes a major step forward today with the launch by Swedish researchers of the Human Pathology Atlas...Read more


NIFK interacts with the proliferation marker Ki-67

2017-05-24
Cancer Cancer Atlas Image of the month Immunohistochemical staining KI-67 Melanoma Pathology Atlas Skin cancer

Skin with growth of a cutaneous melanoma expressing the protein NIFK.

Melanoma is a common form of cancer in the skin and among skin cancers it is the most deadly form. Melanoma originates from cells of melanocytic origin and most typically begins as a small intraepidermal tumor (melanoma in situ). As the tumor continues to grow and progress, tumor cells invade the epidermis and eventually spread to regional lymph nodes and subsequently via hematogenic spread to distant organs. Tumor thickness of the primary tumor is the most important determining prognostic factor and thus is early discovery of key importance for survival...Read more