The human protein atlas blog


Happy Holidays

2016-12-20
X-mas

From all of us to all of you, a very merry christmas

The year of 2016 is coming to an end. We have published 76 blog posts (77 with this one), on everything from Project Discovery to proteomics in narcolepsy, obesity and cancer, portraits of our researchers and of course several Images of the Week.

During the year we have released two new versions of the database, where RNA-seq data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) consortium from 28 different tissues with a corresponding tissue in the Human Protein Atlas have been included, and a new Cell Atlas with spatial location of more than 12,000 genes to 30 different organelles and cellular structures was launched...Read more


The face of Image of the Week

2016-12-13
Cell Atlas Cell cycle Imaging Proteomics

Devin Sullivan

Over the last couple of months, you have hade the pleasure to see Image of the week here on the blog, where an image we find particularly interesting has been shown and discussed. Now that our Cell Atlas is out, you can browse images of your favorite protein directly in our database! In addition to all the images we have added, there are also new "Human Cell" chapters, which provide a knowledge-based analysis of the human cellular proteomes and an entry into the Human Protein Atlas from different perspectives...Read more


Cell Atlas release

2016-12-05
Cell Atlas

Emma Lundberg launching the Cell Atlas

Yesterday our new Cell Atlas was released, at the American Society of Cell Biology Meeting. The Cell Atlas is an open-access interactive database with unparalleled high-resolution images. It visualizes for the first time the location of over 12,000 proteins in cells – opening the way to spatial proteomics, an exciting new discipline predicted to lead to a fundamental increase in our understanding of human health and disease.

Prof Mathias Uhlen, Director of the Human Protein Atlas explains:

– After the genome projects that has characterized the number of human protein-coding genes, the next step is to elucidate the function of these proteins...Read more


Automated cell imaging

2016-11-29
Cell Atlas Imaging Microscopy

One of the images in the Cell Atlas: EGFR

Over the last couple of weeks, readers of this blog have learnt about how we culture cells, and how we prepare them for microscopy. This week, the time has come to look into the actual imaging.

Martin Hjelmare is lab manager in the Cell Profiling group, and has worked within the Human Protein Atlas since 2007, the first couple of years in the protein factory, and since 2008 in the Cell Profiling group.

– In the protein factory I learnt a lot about basic lab routines; up scaling of protein expression, coupling columns, running gels, etc. This was very useful when I started working in the group of Emma Lundberg...Read more


Sample preparation – planning is crucial

2016-11-22
Antibody Cell Atlas Immunofluorescence

Christian Gnann by the Tecan's Freedom EVO pipetting robot

To prepare all the images for the Cell Atlas, released on December 4, the cells used are primed for staining and microscopy. Sample preparation is an important step when performing immunofluorescence studies. If wrongly applied it can not only cause unsuccessful detection but also generate misleading information.

The sample preparation performed by the Cell Atlas team includes cell fixation, permeabilization, and immunostaining with primary and secondary antibodies.

– The fixation is the crucial step, and different fixation protocols work better for different sets of proteins, Christian Gnann, a research engineer in the Cell Profiling group explains...Read more