THE HUMAN PROTEIN ATLAS BLOG

Tissue Image of the Month - Hairs and follicles

2017-02-17   |   0 Comments
Follicles Hair Image of the week Tissue Atlas

A hair and hair follicle stained with H&E showing the different layers: a) external root sheath, b) internal root sheath, c) cuticle layer, d) medulla and e) cortex.

Hello everyone!

Tissue Atlas group is pleased to announce the launch of the Tissue Image of the Month. Previously, you have had the joy of experiencing interesting images of cellular organelles and proteins described by the Cell Atlas. Now we also hope that you will follow the blog posts and pictures of stained tissues with the same excitement and curiosity, as we dive into the world of histology, immunohistochemistry, cells and tissues.

First up - hairs and hair follicles.

Hair fibers consist of cells called trichocytes. The fibers vary in size, disposition and color due to factors such as age, sex, ethnicity and region of the body...Read more


Image of the week - Halloween edition!!! BAT3

2016-10-31   |   0 Comments
Cell Atlas Image of the week

Happy Halloween!!!

This week we look at a very spooky protein, BAT3 which localizes to the nucleoplasm (looks like jack o'lanterns if you squint hard enough) and cytoplasm of the cell as seen in Figure 1 in A-431 cells.

In addition to having a spooky name, this protein, also known as BAG6, was first identified as being involved in programmed cell death (apoptosis). Subsequent studies have revealed that BAT3 plays a role in many important cellular processes including gene regulation, protein synthesis, protein quality control, and protein degradation (Binici J & Koch J. 2014)...Read more


Image of the week - the Kinetochore

2016-10-22   |   0 Comments
Cell Atlas Cytokinetic bridge Image of the week Kinetochore

It's time for another HPA image of the week! This week we would like to tease an annotation that is not yet publicly available, but is coming soon in the December 4 release of the Cell Atlas.

During the cell cycle, each chromosome containing your DNA replicates. During mitosis, each chromosome lines up with its copy in the middle of the cell. At this point, the copies of each chromosome are pulled apart from each other via a structure called the mitotic spindle. In order for this chromosomal separation to happen correctly, the two copies of each chromosome must be attached to the microtubules via the kinetochore ( DeLuca J.G. et al 2002)...Read more


Image of the week - Autophagy and the nobel prize

2016-10-09   |   0 Comments
autophagy Image of the week nobel prize

Figure 1. taining of DRAM2 (green) with DNA (blue) and microtubules (red) in U-2 OS cells.

This week the 2016 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine was announced and has been awarded to Yoshinori Ohsumi for his work in with understanding autophagy. Congratulations to Dr. Ohsumi on his well deserved award! Please read the link above for a great and brief explanation of Dr. Ohsumi's contributions and other important discoveries related to autophagy.

This week we highlight DNA damage regulated autophagy modulator 2 (DRAM2), a well known inhibitor of autophagy. Figure 1 shows an example of DRAM2 in U2 OS human osteosarcoma cells...Read more


Image of the week - Lysosomes

2016-09-16   |   0 Comments
Image of the week Lysosomes Subcell Atlas

Figure 1. Staining of TMEM192 (green) with DNA (blue) in U-2 OS cells.

Welcome to another HPA image of the week! This week we take a look at another member of the vesicle family, the lysosomes.

In a way, lysosomes can be thought of as the recycling plants of your cells. Lysosomes are small membrane bound vesicular organelles that degrade biomolecules within your cells so that the materials in these molecules can be recycled and used for other cellular processes. Often these biomolecules come from vesicles known as endosomes that bring in materials from outside your cells, however lysosomes are also known to degrade other organelles, and products from within the cell...Read more


Image of the week - Endoplasmic reticulum

2016-09-02   |   0 Comments
Endoplasmic reticulum Image of the week Subcell Atlas

Staining of Calnexin (green) with DNA (blue) in A-431 cells

Welcome back blog fans! After a brief hiatus the image of the week highlights from the HPA are back! This week we are discussing the Endoplasmic reticulum, which is not just difficult to say, but is where many of your proteins are made.

The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is one of the largest organelles in the cell. It is a delicate membranous network composed of sheets and tubules that spreads throughout the whole cytoplasm and is actually contiguous to the nuclear membrane. Two major forms of the ER can be distinguished: the rough ER and the smooth ER. Both have different functions...Read more


Image of the week - Cytoplasm

2016-08-05   |   0 Comments
Cytoplasm Image of the week Subcell Atlas

Figure 1. Staining of RELA (green) with DAPI (blue) and microtubules (red) in U2 OS cells.

Though frequently overlooked as being a "catch-all" for proteins that don't reside within another organelle, cytoplasmic proteins are anything but.

One important role of proteins in the cytoplasm is the regulation of gene expression. There are two main ways in which gene expression is regulated; when converting the genetic code in your DNA to RNA (transcription), and when converting RNA to proteins (translation). Though transcription (DNA to RNA) occurs in the nucleus, cytoplasmic proteins are often involved in activating transcription factors which then move to the nucleus to perform transcription.

The protein stained in Fig 1...Read more


Image of the week - The tiny but mighty centrosome

2016-07-08   |   0 Comments
Centrosome Image of the week Subcell Atlas

Figure 1. Staining of MKKS (green) with DNA (blue) and microtubules (red) in U-2 OS cells.

Let's have a look at another fascinating compartment of the cell, the centrosome! Located in close proximity to the nucleus, the centrosome is so small that it sometimes suffers from being overlooked. However, despite its humble size it is a very important organelle with great impact on cellular function.

The centrosome was first described in 1888 and has been a very popular organelle to study among biology researchers ever since (Conduit P.T. 2015). The most well characterized function of the centrosome is to serve as the organizing center for the microtubules that build up the internal architecture of the cell, the so-called cytoskeleton...Read more


Image of the week - the cell cycle and mitosis

2016-07-01   |   0 Comments
Cell cycle Image of the week Mitosis Subcell Atlas

Figure 1. Selected cells from the Subcellular HPA showing the progression of the stages of mitosis (clockwise), with DNA (blue) and microtubules (red) in U-2 OS cells.

It's time for another Image of the week! This week's image is brought to us by Diana Mahdessian, who works on the Subcellular protein atlas, and highlights cell division and various stages of mitosis. In previous blogs we have discussed the importance of certain proteins in the cell cycle including dividing centrosomes and FDXR in mitochondria.

The cell cycle is an ordered series of events that ultimately leads to the division of the "mother" cell into two "daughter" cells (cells are given feminine names because they are capable of reproducing).

The cell cycle consists of three distinct phases; interphase, mitosis and cytokinesis...Read more


Image of the week - Intermediate filaments

2016-06-24   |   0 Comments
Image of the week Intermediate filaments Subcell Atlas

Figure 1. Staining of VIM (green) with DNA (blue) in U-251 MG cells.

Welcome back to HPA image of the week! This week we highlight another organelle brought to us by Mikaela Wiking aka HPA_Illuminator, the intermediate filaments!

Intermediate filaments are one of the three cytoskeletons of the cell, together with actin filaments and microtubules.

The expression of intermediate filaments can be extremely dependent on cell type, for example the intermediate filament protein group keratins, discussed in a previous IOTW, are key components in hair, nails and skin...Read more


Image of the week - Mitochondria by Illuminator

2016-06-17   |   0 Comments
Image of the week Mitochondria Subcell Atlas

Figure 1. Staining of TOMM5 (green) with DNA (blue) in HeLa cells.

Welcome back to Image of The Week! We will be periodically highlighting an organelle in the coming image of the week posts, written by members of the Subcellular Human Protein Atlas project. This week we kick things off with a post by HPA_Illuminator, and what better way to start than with the mitochondria, the (true) powerhouse of the cell!!!

Mitochondria are found in almost all human cells, in varying numbers. They are known as the powerhouse of the cell as they are responsible for producing the majority of the energy in your body (in the form of ATP, adenosine triphosphate)...Read more


Image of the week - FDXR by solartech0

2016-06-10   |   0 Comments
Citizen Science Image of the week Mitochondria Project Discovery Subcell Atlas

Figure 1. Staining of FDXR (green) with DNA (blue) and microtubules (red) in A549 cells.

Welcome to HPA image of the week! This week's image was brought to us by citizen scientists in Project Discovery, and specifically by solartech0 who found this image while playing Project Discovery in EVE online.

The protein stained in Fig 1. is an image of ferredoxin reductase (FDXR) found in the mitochondria of the cell. This sample shows a staining of FDXR in A549 adenocarcinomic alveolar basal epithelial cells.

FDXR is a protein involved in cellular metabolism. This process is what provides energy for our cells and is carried out in the mitochondria of the cell...Read more


Image of the week - Moesin & siRNA from x Truf

2016-06-03   |   0 Comments
Citizen Science Image of the week Plasma membrane Project Discovery Subcell Atlas

Figure 1. Staining of MSN (green) with DNA (blue) and microtubules (red) in U-251 MG cells. S

It's time for another HPA image of the week! This week's image was brought to us by citizen scientists in Project Discovery, and specifically by x Truf a member of the Signal Cartel in EVE online who found this image while playing Project Discovery.

The protein stained in Fig 1. is an image of Moesin (MSN) found in the plasma membrane of the cell. This sample shows a staining of MSN in U-251 MG human glioblastoma astrocytoma (brain) cells.

MSN is a member of the ERM family which provide a link between plasma membranes and actin filaments. This link was briefly discussed in a previous blog...Read more


Image of the week - Focal Adhesions by Shiverwarp

2016-05-20   |   0 Comments
Citizen Science Focal Adhesions Image of the week Project Discovery Subcell Atlas

Staining of CORO2B (green) with tubules (red) and DNA (blue) in U-251 MG cells.

Welcome to another HPA image of the week! This week's image was brought to us by citizen scientists in Project Discovery, and specifically by Shiverwarp who found this image while playing Project Discovery in EVE online.

The protein stained in Fig 1. is an image of Coronin, actin binding protein, 2B (CORO2B) found in the focal adhesions and at the plasma membrane of the cell. This sample shows U-251 MG human glioblastoma astrocytoma (brain) cells.

Focal adhesions are transmembrane groups of protein that allow the cell to "grab" the surrounding environment...Read more


Image of the week - Nuclear speckles, Selphentine

2016-05-13   |   0 Comments
Citizen Science Image of the week Nuclear speckles Project Discovery Subcell Atlas

Fig 1. Staining of DDX39B (green) with tubules (red) and DNA (blue) in MCF-7 cells.

Welcome to another HPA image of the week! This week's image was brought to us by citizen scientists in Project Discovery, and specifically by Selphentine who pointed out several nice examples of proteins localized to "nuclear speckles". In Project Discovery, citizen scientists are refining our annotations for proteins within the nucleus by labeling these nuclear speckles, previously not annotated in the atlas.

The protein stained in Fig 1. is an image of DEAD (Asp-Glu-Ala-Asp) box polypeptide 39B (DDX39B) seen in the nuclear speckles. This sample shows MCF-7 cells, a human adenocarcinoma cell line from breast cancer...Read more


Image of the week - CDC42 and actin filaments

2016-05-06   |   0 Comments
Actin Cell cycle Image of the week Immunofluorescence Subcell Atlas

Fig 1. Staining of CDC42EP4 (green) with DAPI (blue) and microtubules (red) in U2 OS cells.

This week HPA image of the week, I've decided to highlight two of my favorite things, the cell cycle and actin filaments!

The protein labeled in Fig 1. is an image of Cell division cycle 42 effector protein (Rho GTPase binding) 4 (CDC42EP4). In addition to being quite a mouthful, this protein resides in the cytoplasm and is associated with the actin filaments. In this image, CDC42EP4 is seen in U-2 OS human osteosarcoma cells.

As the name suggests, the CDC42EP4 is a protein associated with CDC42, which helps regulate the transition from G1 to S (in which DNA is replicated), and is essential for proper cell cycle progression (Yasuda S et al. 2006)...Read more


Image of the week - GAD1 in the brain

2016-04-26   |   0 Comments
Brain Image of the week Mouse Brain Atlas

Fig 1. Staining of GAD1 (green) and DAPI (blue) in mouse forebrain cortex and interbrain thalamus and hypothalamus.

This week, the Human Protein Atlas is highlighting a new atlas recently released in HPA 14, The Mouse Brain Atlas. This image from The Mouse Brain Atlas was brought to us by Nadya Petseva, a team member on the project. I know what you're thinking, what's a mouse doing in the "human" protein atlas?!

Though we typically deal with human cells and tissues in the HPA, it is not currently possible to image full human brain at the cellular level, whereas using a mouse brain we can gain key insights into how proteins in the brain function in situ. This makes mice an attractive "model organism" as their brains actually consist of very similar regions to those found in humans...Read more


Image of the week - Membrane by Aleksandra Shaishi

2016-04-22   |   0 Comments
Citizen Science Image of the week Project Discovery Subcell Atlas

Fig 1. Staining of SLCA (3 & 14) (green) with tubules (red) and DNA (blue) in CACO-2 cells. This image was taken directly as posted by Aleksandra Shaishi and thus color-channel toggles can be seen at the bottom of the image.

It's the end of the week, and that means another HPA image of the week! This week's image was brought to us by citizen scientists in Project Discovery, and specifically by Aleksandra Shaishi who found this image playing Project Discovery.

The protein labeled in Fig 1. is an image of the antibody HPA006539, which labels solute carrier family 2 (facilitated glucose transporter) (SLC2A) member 3 and member 14. This is what we call a "multi-targeting" antibody as it binds more than one protein...Read more


Image of the week - Nucleoli rim found by Yadaryon

2016-04-08   |   0 Comments
Citizen Science Image of the week Nucleoli Project Discovery Subcell Atlas

Fig 1. Staining of nucleoli rim by NPM1 (green) with tubules (red) in A-431 cells.

It's time for another Image of the week! This week's image was brought to us by citizen scientists in Project Discovery, and specifically by Yadaryon who pointed out several nice examples of proteins localized to the rim of the nucleoli.

The nucleolus is an organelle within the nucleus of your cells. There may be one or more nucleoli in each nucleus, but they usually occur in small numbers. The primary job of the nucleoli is to assemble ribosomes which in turn make proteins within your cells...Read more


Image of the week - Polarized HEP G2 membrane

2016-04-02   |   0 Comments
Citizen Science Image of the week Project Discovery Subcell Atlas

Staining of plasma membrane (green) with tubules (red) and DNA (blue) in HEP G2 cells.

Welcome to the second edition of image of the week. This week's image was brought to us by citizen scientists in Project Discovery. After analyzing the recent data from the project, this image was among the most frequently labeled as "abnormal" by the users.

This is an image of EPB41L1 (erythrocyte membrane protein band 4.1-like 1). This staining is observed in HEP G2 human liver hepatocellular carcinoma cells. As you can clearly see here, there is significant cell-to-cell variation (CCD) in the staining, and even within a single cell at times.

As the name suggests, this is a well known membrane protein...Read more