The human protein atlas blog


The HPA at the Image-based Cell Atlas Meeting

2017-10-06
Cell Atlas Image analysis Proteomics

Participants at the Image-based Cell Atlas Meeting 2017

The importance of mapping the human cell has become recognized as one of the key challenges in modern biology. Image-based assays offer a data-rich medium of studying cells and their proteins in situ. As such, several large-scale initiatives for studying cellular biology using image-based assays have been founded in recent years...Read more


The face of Image of the Week

2016-12-13
Cell Atlas Cell cycle Imaging Proteomics

Devin Sullivan

Over the last couple of months, you have hade the pleasure to see Image of the week here on the blog, where an image we find particularly interesting has been shown and discussed. Now that our Cell Atlas is out, you can browse images of your favorite protein directly in our database! In addition to all the images we have added, there are also new "Human Cell" chapters, which provide a knowledge-based analysis of the human cellular proteomes and an entry into the Human Protein Atlas from different perspectives...Read more


New Cell Atlas coming up

2016-11-08
Cell Atlas Project Discovery Proteomics

Emma Lundberg, Director of the Cell Atlas

In less than one month from now, we will release a new version of our database, HPA16! The biggest news is the introduction of a brand new Cell Atlas. It will be an image-based atlas over the subcellular distribution of the human proteome.

– Cells are the machinery of life. Much of the bustling activity in the human cell results from proteins performing specific tasks in designated compartments, the organelles. The Cell Atlas that we are creating will be image-based and describe the subcellular distribution of the human proteome, says Emma Lundberg, Director of the Cell Atlas...Read more


Biomarker for prostate cancer

2016-11-01
Autoantibody Biomarkers Prostate Proteomics

Fig1. Workflow

In a recent study in Journal of Proteome Research by Human Protein Atlas-researchers a new reactive epitope of a prostate specific protein, particularly reactive in the late stages of prostate cancer is identified.

According to WHO, prostate cancer is the second most incident cancer in men and the fifth leading cause of death in men worldwide, and there is a demand for novel targets and approaches to diagnose and treat this cancer type. Five-year survival is reached by almost 100% of patients if the disease is still at a local and regional stage; however, the survival rate drops down to 30% in the case of aggressive form with distant metastasis and relapse after treatment...Read more


Important link between genomics and proteomics

2016-10-25
Genomics Mass Spectrometry Proteomics

Several previous reports have concluded that RNA levels cannot be used to predict protein levels. However, in a new study from KTH Royal Institute of Technology, published in the journal Molecular Systems Biology scientists from the Human Protein Atlas show that protein levels can be predicted from RNA levels if a gene-specific RNA-to-protein factor is used.

The human genome consists of DNA, a molecule that contains the instructions needed to build and maintain cells. For the instructions to be carried out, DNA must be read and transcribed into RNA transcripts that can be used to produce protein. The transcriptome is a collection of all the transcripts present in a cell...Read more